Monsanto Hawaii committed to sustainable agriculture

Monsanto Hawaii uses a wide range of tools and methods to care for our crops and our farms for the long term. Our stewardship practices include a robust program to reduce crop damage, promote biodiversity, and ensure we maintain healthy crops and productive, sustainable farms.

Here are some of the tools we use to care for our farms:

• Netting to protect plants in the same way that window screens keep insects out of homes.

• Sticky traps to capture flying pests, similar to fly paper or roach traps.

• Fences to prevent wild animals from entering our fields.

• Growing border plants around our fields to intercept many pests before they reach our crops.

Stewarding our Farms

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• Just as buildings can be inspected for termites, we inspect our fields frequently to identify pests before they overwhelm our crops.

• Between harvests, we plant cover crops like oats, sunflowers, cowpeas and buckwheat to keep our soil healthy and reduce insects and diseases that could affect future crops.

• Cover crops also suppress weeds and attract beneficial insects – such as ladybugs and lacewings – that help protect our fields from unwanted pests – i.e., “good bugs” eating “bad bugs.”

• To outsmart some pests, we use weather conditions, good timing and best planting locations to our advantage.

• When pest pressures become too great, we apply pesticides using precision application equipment that distributes the right amount at the right rate in the right location. All of our applicators receive ongoing training, and are certified by the state, or are directly supervised by a certified applicator, in full compliance with federal and state requirements.

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Monsanto is committed to sustainable agriculture and to being a good steward of Hawaii’s natural resources. Learn more about what we do to support conservation and sustainability in the islands.

Our Monsanto Molokai employees have planted nearly 1,850 native trees, shrubs and understory species to protect 478 acres of our farmland.